Play Bands

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Kids love to bind things together (at least my do) with as many knots as possible…. Crocheting some play bands is quick and easy and yields nice soft bands.

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Here is how to make them:

Make many chain stitches – about two meters or as long as you want your play band to be. Then crochet back with single stitches. Crochet about 3-6 rows all together. If you feel wild you can use different colors for each (or each second) row. In the example shown above I changed color every second row and made the play band six rows wide and about two meters long.

This post first appeared on tamtamtiger.wordpress.com.

baby boshi

 

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I wanted to make a boshi for some time now. Boshi (Japanese: hat) is a recent trend in Germany and stands for handmade (mainly crocheted) hats. The trend was started by two students and now you can see even big rough guys sitting quietly with a crochet hook.

Our newest family member was in acute need of a hat, so I had an excuse to try my hands on making a boshi. During our postpartum days, when I couldn’t do much more than lying in bed and cuddling with the new baby, this was a very welcome occupation.

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Here is my version of a baby boshi (head circumference ca. 34 cm):

Yarn: Debbie Bliss 50% cotton, 50% merino wool; crochet hook: 4mm

Start with 5 chain stitches, close them to a loop with a slip stitch. Into this loop make 8 half double stitches. In the next round double each stitch (16 half double stitches), and in the next round double them again (32 half double stitches). Then double every fifth stitch until you reach the desired circumference minus one cm (56 stitches). Continue with double half stitches until the you reach the desired hight of the hat. Finish with one round of double stitches.

For the band I used a contrast color and, using chain stitches, made one long chain, which I wove into the double stitches of the back half of the hat. I made a second short chain with small loops on either side which I wove through the double stitches of the front half of the hat. The long ends of the long chain I thread through the loops of the short chain. This allows to adjust the width of the hat a little bit when binding the hat.

This is my contribution to Creadienstag and Made4Boys.

This post appeared first on tamtamtiger.wordpress.com.

Precious harlequin

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This is a precious little harlequin from my childhood. It is ca 30 cm high (plus hat)  and was crocheted by my very gifted great-aunt who passed away a few years ago. Although my mom kept it mostly save from me and gave it to me only occasionally, it got some stains over the years. Otherwise it is still in excellent condition and is now a beloved (occasional) companion to my children. I love it because of its great craftsmanship – look at this delicate collar! – and it is a wonderful memory of this much loved aunt.

Precious is a small series about some precious little things. They are precious to me because of who made them, how they are made and/or which story they tell.

Amish Puzzle Ball

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When I saw this ball on aenni’s wonderful blog recently, I immediately new I had to try to make one. Especially since I am a mathematically trained person with a love for all things geometrical I had to have one of those little geometrical wonders in my own hands. And so I decided to make one for my cousin’s new baby girl using a soft cotton from my stash. I followed aenie’s link to a very good video tutorial of this crochet pattern by Dedri Uys (oh, and you should see Dedri’s amanis!). Originally, this ball is made by the Amish using scraps of fabric. But I really like the crochet version because it is so nice to grab – perfect for little hands. I did not use different colors for the different parts as suggested by the pattern, partly because my stash is very limited on soft cotton yarn (and I wanted to start immediately!), and mainly because I really like the combination of purple and orange shades of this ball of cotton I had. I think the changing colors of the yarn did produce some soft defining lines after all and I really like how it all came together in the end.

I sent the ball to my cousin wrapped into packaging paper which I found in my mom’s basement and which we decorated using our favorite printing technique. This made it a hand-made, stash-busting, up-cycled gift from heart.

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Pattern: Amish puzzle ball, following this video tutorial.

Yarn: 100% cotton from my stash, bought a few years ago at a nice yarn store in Montclaire, NJ.

Needles: crochet hook 3.5 mm

Filling: 100% wool (healing wool)

Would I do it again? Oh yes! The only downside of the pattern is that one has to constantly attentively count…  Next time I will not turn the little hats inside out.

This is my contribution to Creadienstag!

This blog-post first appeared on tamtamtiger.wordpress.com.