Waterfall Shirt

(before dyeing)

So far my sewing efforts mainly concentrated on skirts because I felt that well fitting tops are so difficult to achieve. Therefore I took on the challenge to find (at least) three well fitting patterns for tops. Actually, this was part of my pledge for this year’s Me Made May Challenge (slowly but surely…)!

Top-challenge no. 1 is the waterfall shirt “Scarlett” from Patty-Doo. It took me three iterations until I felt comfortable. First, I selected the wrong size (I always tend to make things too big), and then I had to make the neckline higher (the water was falling a bit too low). But now I am really happy with it!

(after dyeing black/gray)

For practice I used a fabric I bought online, which I obviously couldn’t really touch nor properly see before it arrived at my doorstep. The fabric I finally received was something quite different from what I had expected (way too bright – see the first picture above, and heavy falling viscose instead of a light cotton jersey). I had bought 3m (well, yes) and felt that for practice this (and some other leftover fabric) was definitely good enough. So I put the tops together (four altogether) and then dyed them over with black (above, rather grayish) and blue (below).

(after dyeing blue)

One can still see the original pattern, but the colors are not as bold, and I think the flowers are even more recognizable as such. I am actually rather pleased how the tops came out in the end and really like to wear them!

Pattern: Patty-Doo Waterfall Shirt “Scarlett” (thanks for the fantastic video tutorial!). Alterations: I shortened the neckline as described in the pattern instructions.

Fabric: The fabric was marked as a cotton jersey, but I am pretty sure it is (or contains) viscose.  The rather bold pattern I dyed over using black and blue dye. The pattern is still visible but not as bright.

Will I do it again? Yes!!

This is my contribution to RUMS.

Dieser Blogpost ist auf Englisch. Ich lese und beantworte Kommentare aber gerne auch auf Deutsch.

The post Waterfall Shirt first appeared on tamtamtiger.wordpress.com.

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Foliage wrap-around skirt

Fall is here. The trees are changing into vibrant shades of yellow, orange and red. So wonderful colors and light!

(Okoř, close to Praha)

During the last month I had a major clean-out of my closet and sewing corner. I keep a stack of old clothes which I don’t wear anymore, but the material is too good to be toss out and instead can be used in some sewing project. Several years ago I received an orange corduroy skirt from a family member for exactly that purpose.

During the clean-out this wrap-around skirt resurfaced. Being infected by those wonderful autumn colors around me I wanted to wear a skirt like this!

The original skirt was too long and too tight. So I generously cut off the hem and opened the side seams. From the cut off hem I salvaged rectangular pieces which I inserted into the side seams.

The direction of the corduroy of the skirt is (as usual) vertical, but of the inserted side panels it is horizontal. This I think adds an interesting feature to the skirt! Finally I repositioned the buttons and have now a lovely new old skirt!

Pattern: Refashioning an old skirt. No pattern used.

Fabric: A used corduroy skirt

Will I do it again? Refashioning old clothes? Always!

This is my contribution to RUMS.

Dieser Blogpost ist auf Englisch. Ich lese und beantworte Kommentare aber gerne auch auf Deutsch.

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Sun-Print Skirt

This has been a very longterm project. Two years ago I prepared this fabric for a skirt but never got around putting it together (I was too scared to screw it up). But ow I felt confident enough to finish it and enjoy wearing my new skirt during the last warm days of summer.

Inspired by Alisa’s sun-print bag I tried this technique on a very hot sumer day. First I cut out the pieces for a skirt (my trusted burda pattern, you can see previous versions here, here, here, here and here). Then I colored the fabric with diluted fabric paint and quickly pressed on it leaves I found in the garden. The whole thing I put to dry in the hot sun.

The dried fabric now looked like this – you can see the shape of the leaves:

I am still not sure how exactly this works. Alisa believes that this happens because the leaves absorb the pigments from the wet color. This could be one possibility. An other possibility is that the fabric dries faster where it is not covered by a leave. The water, containing the paint particles, is then sucked out from underneath the leaves (through capillary effects and the moisture gradient) so that there is then less paint where the leaves have been. Or the reason cold be an entirely different one. I am a geek and I love to understand things. So, if you have knowledge (or an opinion) about this I love to hear it!

So, this is the skirt. I kept it very simple, no pockets, invisible zip at the side, no visible seams on the outside. One new thing I tried:  after closing the upper edge of the waist band, I stitched the seam allowance to the inner part of the waist band before folding it over. That way the inner part of the waistband is kept better in place and will not peak out at the upper edge.

The print is not as visible as much as I had hoped and I am still afraid that it might wash out (although I used fabric paint and ironed the thing about a hundred times). Enough reason to try again! Now our summer is almost over but next year I might turn this into an other project with my sons!

Pattern: Burda style 2 / 2010 download-pattern (BM1002 104). I made model B. Alterations: I cut the back in one piece, put the invisible zip into the side seam, omitted the pockets, adjusted the length and have no visible seams on the outside.

Fabric: an old white cotton bed sheet, dyed using  Alisa’s sun-print technique and normal fabric paint bought at the local crafts store.

Will I do it again? YES! Its a fun technique! But next time it will probably something else than a skirt.

This is my contribution to RUMS.

Dieser Blogpost ist auf Englisch. Ich lese und beantworte Kommentare aber gerne auch auf Deutsch.

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Frida

For my youngest I made Frida by Milchmonster. I actually made this already more than two years ago but never got around posting it and, unfortunately, the little one outgrew those nice pants in the meantime. But I had them lying around recently to show to a friend and the little one (he is now three) found them and put them on! They (almost) fit again without diapers! They are just a bit tight and a bit short…..

I made them according to the pattern in size 80 using a pair of old jeans from my husband. The only alteration I made was to use the largest size for the knee patches.

The back pieces I had to patch together because the original jeans had holes. I patched the back pieces and not the front pieces because I felt that might be more comfortable and I patched both sides (although it would not have been necessary) because of symmetry.

The little one was wearing those pants a lot and I am sad that they are now too small. In some blog posts I read that some are putting a rubber-band into the waistband. I didn’t do that. I felt that the pants are cut relatively snug around the hips which keeps them from falling off. But If you want to make them more roomy, a rubber band might be a good idea.

Pattern: Frida by Milchmonster, size 80. Alteration: I used the knee patches for the largest size.

Fabric: old jeans, leftover pieces of thick fabric for the knee patches, elastic jersey for the cuffs and waist-band from local fabric store.

Will I do it again? I have no plans now. But I start thinking that my oldest might like a pair!

This is my contribution to Made4Boys.

Dieser Blogpost ist auf Englisch. Ich lese und beantworte Kommentare aber gerne auch auf Deutsch.

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This was my MeMadeMay17

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Today is the last day of May and the last day of Me Made May 2017. I really enjoyed this challenge! It forced me to consider my clothes more than I usually do. This May had extreme temperatures – below 10C in the beginning of the month and around 30C during the last days. So I could wear my me made warm as well as my summer cloths.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I did manage to fulfill (most of) my pledge:

  1. I did wear at least one me made item at least 5 days per week.  I wore 6 different skirts (21 days), 1 dress (once) and 3 different tops (6 days). A clear favorite for cooler days is my up-cycled jeans skirt (above left; I wore it on 9 days). For warmer weather I really liked to wear the pink flower skirt (above right; I wore it on 4 days).
  2. Par of my pledge was to make and wear me made tops. I did wear three different me made tops. Two are new and one is from last summer. I did not blog about them jet, because I am not that happy about how they turned out. I find it extremely difficult to make a pattern for a top fit properly – even if made from jersey. Thus I am still in the process to make 2-3 different well fitting tops. So this part of the pledge I did not fulfill completely but I am intensely working on it!
  3. I did start to clean out my wardrobe and rediscovered old items. I also dyed over a few items and gave them a second life. Inspired by the  Wardrobe Architect on the Colette blog I stared to analyze my preferences and I discovered that apparently I really like flowery patterns (for some it might seem obvious but to me it actually was a surprise….)!

What did I learn during this challenge:

  • I can and really like to wear my me made items.
  • I urgently need tops to wear with my skirts. Simple and nice tops. Yes, this is my “top-challenge”!
  • I do need more variety. I need a longer skirt and summer pants. A cardigan would be nice, too. (the list goes on….)

Thanks to Zoe for initiating MeMadeMay! I am feeling so proud that I actually could join this year. It is a great motivation to continue working on a me made wardrobe!

This is my contribution to MMM17.

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Tablecloth-Skirt

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My oldest son’s passion are marionettes. His stories typically revolve around princesses, kings, a fakir and his snake, and their fight against evil. For the costumes and stage decorations he uses all scraps of fabric I can (and sometimes rather not) spare. Recently, I took him along to a local thrift store so he could look around for things to use in his play. We went home with a bag full of treasures – not only for him. I found a beautiful round blueprint tablecloth.

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I immediately remembered the full circle skirts Frau Kirsche made from round tablecloths (unfortunately, she closed down her blog, but she published a tutorial here)!

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Following her instructions, this is how I made my skirt:

  1. I measured my waist, and cut a hole with the same circumference in the middle, with seam allowance added. I stitched a supporting seam around the hole. Note to self: instead of cutting a perfect circle, I should have followed the pattern – now the waistline doesn’t look very even.
  2. I divided the the cut-out circle into stripes and made from it the outside of the waistband. For the inside I used a piece of blue cotton fabric from my stash.
  3. The tablecloth did have a seam across, which means it was made from two half circles. I opened the seam a bit on one side of the cut-out hole to insert an invisible zip.
  4. Despite careful measurements and calculations, the skirt turned out to be a bit too wide. So I inserted additionally an elastic band into the waistband, so that the skirt doesn’t fall off my hips.

And thats my long full circle summer skirt – right on time for the beginning of summer – and finished thanks to the Sommer-Rock Sew-Along of Meike and Lucy on the MeMadeMittwoch blog! It is nice and airy and a perfect hiding place for small (and not so small) children.

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Pattern: no pattern but I followed Frau Kirsche’s Tutorial.

Fabric: second-hand round tablecloth

Will I do it again? Yes, if the right table cloth comes along.

This is my first time participating at MeMadeMittwoch, this long admired parade of women wearing self-made clothes! 

Dieser Blogpost ist in Englisch. Ich lese und beantworte Kommentare aber gerne auch auf Deutsch.

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Synaptic Boogie

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What is a Synaptic Boogie you may ask, and what or who is dancing it? Well, let me tell you, those are neurons on the t-shirt dancing this boogie. Eh? I guess this is what happens when a bunch of neuroscientists sit together for several weeks – their mind just goes all boogie…..

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Anyhow, this is t-shirt no. 2 from my husband’s beloved t-shirt collection. Since t-shirt no. 1 was refashioned for our little one, t-shirt no. 2 was destined to be transformed for my older boy. I cut for him a t-shirt and to make it a bit more interesting, I used contrasting colored thread and blue cuff fabric for neckline and sleeves. This was only the second pieces I made following a design by Ottobre and I was utterly confused about where to add seam allowance and where not. As a a result I did not add seam allowance to the neckline and now it is a bit too wide. I should have at least added a wider cuff…. But my boy loves to be able to wear papa’s t-shirt, although it is still a bit too wide. I hope this thing will last long enough for my boy to properly grow into it. And he wears his t-shirt with short I showed here!

Pattern: Ottobre 3/2013 No. 11 “Birthday Fish” t-shirt, without applications.

Fabric: old t-shirt, cuff fabric from local fabric store.

Will I sew it again? Yes, I like the pattern. And hopefully next time I will be better about the neckline….

This blogpost  is my contribution to Made4BOYS! and my kid wears!

Amish Puzzle Ball

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When I saw this ball on aenni’s wonderful blog recently, I immediately new I had to try to make one. Especially since I am a mathematically trained person with a love for all things geometrical I had to have one of those little geometrical wonders in my own hands. And so I decided to make one for my cousin’s new baby girl using a soft cotton from my stash. I followed aenie’s link to a very good video tutorial of this crochet pattern by Dedri Uys (oh, and you should see Dedri’s amanis!). Originally, this ball is made by the Amish using scraps of fabric. But I really like the crochet version because it is so nice to grab – perfect for little hands. I did not use different colors for the different parts as suggested by the pattern, partly because my stash is very limited on soft cotton yarn (and I wanted to start immediately!), and mainly because I really like the combination of purple and orange shades of this ball of cotton I had. I think the changing colors of the yarn did produce some soft defining lines after all and I really like how it all came together in the end.

I sent the ball to my cousin wrapped into packaging paper which I found in my mom’s basement and which we decorated using our favorite printing technique. This made it a hand-made, stash-busting, up-cycled gift from heart.

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Pattern: Amish puzzle ball, following this video tutorial.

Yarn: 100% cotton from my stash, bought a few years ago at a nice yarn store in Montclaire, NJ.

Needles: crochet hook 3.5 mm

Filling: 100% wool (healing wool)

Would I do it again? Oh yes! The only downside of the pattern is that one has to constantly attentively count…  Next time I will not turn the little hats inside out.

This is my contribution to Creadienstag!

This blog-post first appeared on tamtamtiger.wordpress.com.

Play Suit

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I was sorting through my husband’s t-shirts yesterday. Yes, I wanted to get some order into his things, that too, but I admit that the real reason was that I wanted to find some old t-shirts for a project I had in mind.  The old t-shirts I found were some much loved graphical shirts from long ago summer schools he had been to, but they were not suitable for my project. So, I reconsidered and converted one of the t-shirts into a play suit for our younger son (which made it much easier for my husband to say good-bye to them…).

Luckily I still had enough cuff fabric and matching thread in a nice contrasting red. The pattern was quickly found and traced and the pieces cut, maneuvering around the existing holes. Since I don’t have an overlocker I closed all seams using my normal sewing machine and a simple zig-zag stitching. I first closed the seam using a very narrow zig-zag and then secured the seam allowance with a large zig-zag top stitching. I had a bit of trouble with those buttons – it was the first time I was using them and it took me quite a few trials until they where acceptable.

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Overall I am quite happy with the outcome. The fit is not as perfect as I would have liked (too large arm holes, too long legs), but other than that I like how the two colors came together and the pictures became part to the design.

Pattern: Ottobre 3/2013 Nr. 2 with modifications: no pockets.

Fabric: Old t-shirt, cuff fabric from my stash.

Will I sew it again? Yes, but with some fitting modifications: smaller arm wholes, shorter legs.

This blogpost  is my contribution to Made4BOYS!

Update: because he is wearing this suit for the first time today (Monday, August 5), I will also show it at my kid wears!

Upcycled skirt

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Inspired by Sanne naeht I transformed my old jeans, which just tore at the back, into a skirt. The large tear made the transformation a bit tricky, and I needed about a billion times to try-it-on-tear-it apart-put-it-back-together-again.

Unlike Sanne I used one of the cut-off legs to make the gussets in front and back, which I needed because of the tear. And it made the skirt a bit wider than the quite tight jeans, an added benefit…. I even added some embroidery (haven’t done this since school years)!

Will I do this again? Yes – especially because now I know how to do it and next time it will be sooooo much easier.